About

Film Synopsis

Kim Alexander lives as close to the city as you can get and still be country. The furthest an egg travels from his farm is 30 miles, a
distance unheard of in our global food economy. Though a staple in American diets, the origins of our eggs can be a mystery.

Author Bio

Publicly-educated in Texas, Keeley hopes to make information appealing and useful. She is currently seeking a dual degree in the College of Communication as well as the College of Liberal Arts.  In 2007 she received an Undergraduate Research Fellowship for her study of eggs, including a written analysis of eggs in American food culture and leading to her short film,  Alexander Family Farm. She currently works as a hostess in Austin  (at a restaurant that serves Alexander Farm eggs), and is in the research stage for a written thesis about food blogs. This fall Keeley plans to work as an intern for the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center with her eyes on college graduation in spring 2010.

Alexander Family Farm is an official selection of the UFRAME International Film Festival 2008 in Portugal, as well as SXSW Film Festival 2009 . The film has also screened at the University of Texas as well as during the Slow Food Nation conference summer 2008 in San Francisco.

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3 responses to “About

  1. Mary Allbright

    I so enjoyed seeing this documentary. My family and I are originally from East Texas. We now live in rural Arkansas and are trying to get back to nature and the way our Lord meant for us to live. Thank you for a documentary that gives us hope and encouragement.

  2. Leinani

    I am so enthused to have “found” your website and viewed this documentary. We, too, are trying to make our way back into a simpler, more natural lifestyle. This documentary has been so encouraging. Would the Alexander Family Farm process broilers that we would raise? If so, can you email me with the details. Thank you very much.

  3. Samantha

    Wonderful Video looking forward to trying your broilers soon. Love Joel Salatin Pasture Poultry method

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